440-463-7095 dale@dalestefancic.com
11 Things Ultra-Productive People Do Differently

11 Things Ultra-Productive People Do Differently

When it comes to productivity, we all face the same challenge—there are only 24 hours in a day.

Yet some people seem to have twice the time; they have an uncanny ability to get things done. Even when juggling multiple projects, they reach their goals without fail.

“Time is really the only capital that any human being has, and the only thing he can’t afford to lose. –Thomas Edison”

We all want to get more out of life. There’s arguably no better way to accomplish this than by finding ways to do more with the precious time you’ve been given.

It feels incredible when you leave the office after an ultra-productive day. It’s a workplace high that’s hard to beat.

With the right approach, you can make this happen every day.

You don’t need to work longer or push yourself harder—you just need to work smarter.

Ultra-productive people know this. As they move through their days they rely on productivity hacks that make them far more efficient. They squeeze every drop out of every hour without expending any extra effort.

The best thing about these hacks is they’re easy to implement. So easy that you can begin using them today.

Give them a read, give them a whirl, and watch your productivity soar.

1. They Never Touch Things Twice

Productive people never put anything in a holding pattern, because touching things twice is a huge time-waster. Don’t save an email or a phone call to deal with later. As soon as something gets your attention you should act on it, delegate it or delete it.

2. They Get Ready for Tomorrow Before They Leave the Office

Productive people end each day by preparing for the next. This practice accomplishes two things: it helps you solidify what you’ve accomplished today, and it ensures you’ll have a productive tomorrow. It only takes a few minutes and it’s a great way to end your workday.

“For every minute spent organizing, an hour is earned. –Benjamin Franklin”

3. They Eat Frogs

“Eating a frog” is the best antidote for procrastination, and ultra-productive people start each morning with this tasty treat. In other words, they do the least appetizing, most dreaded item on their to-do list before they do anything else. After that, they’re freed up to tackle the stuff that excites and inspires them.

4. They Fight The Tyranny Of The Urgent

The tyranny of the urgent refers to the tendency of little things that have to be done right now to get in the way of what really matters. This creates a huge problem as urgent actions often have little impact.

If you succumb to the tyranny of the urgent, you can find yourself going days, or even weeks, without touching the important stuff. Productive people are good at spotting when putting out fires is getting in the way of their performance, and they’re willing to ignore or delegate the things that get in the way of real forward momentum.

“Time is what we want most, but what we use worst. –William Penn”

5. They Stick to the Schedule During Meetings

Meetings are the biggest time waster there is. Ultra-productive people know that a meeting will drag on forever if they let it, so they inform everyone at the onset that they’ll stick to the intended schedule. This sets a limit that motivates everyone to be more focused and efficient.

“The bad news is time flies. The good news is you’re the pilot. –Michael Altshuler”

6. They Say No

No is a powerful word that ultra-productive people are not afraid to wield. When it’s time to say no, they avoid phrases such as I don’t think I can or I’m not certain. Saying no to a new commitment honors your existing commitments and gives you the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

Research conducted at the University of California in San Francisco shows that the more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Learn to use no, and it will lift your mood, as well as your productivity.

7. They Only Check E-mail At Designated Times

Ultra-productive people don’t allow e-mail to be a constant interruption. In addition to checking e-mail on a schedule, they take advantage of features that prioritize messages by sender. They set alerts for their most important vendors and their best customers, and they save the rest until they reach a stopping point. Some people even set up an autoresponder that lets senders know when they’ll be checking their e-mail again.

8. They Don’t Multitask

Ultra-productive people know that multitasking is a real productivity killer. Research conducted at Stanford University confirms that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another. Ouch.

Multitasking reduces your efficiency and performance because your brain can only focus on one thing at a time. When you try to do two things at once, your brain lacks the capacity to perform both tasks successfully.

9. They Go off The Grid

Don’t be afraid to go off grid when you need to. Give one trusted person a number to call in case of emergency, and let that person be your filter. Everything has to go through them, and anything they don’t clear has to wait. This strategy is a bulletproof way to complete high-priority projects.

“One man gets only a week’s value out of a year while another man gets a full year’s value out of a week. –Charles Richards”

10. They Delegate

Ultra-productive people accept the fact that they’re not the only smart, talented person in their organization. They trust people to do their jobs so that they can focus on their own.

11. They Put Technology to Work for Them

Technology catches a lot of flak for being a distraction, but it can also help you focus. Ultra-productive people put technology to work for them. Beyond setting up filters in their e-mail accounts so that messages are sorted and prioritized as they come in, they use apps like IFTTT, which sets up contingencies on your smart phone and alerts you when something important happens. This way, when your stock hits a certain price or you have an email from your best customer, you’ll know it. There’s no need to be constantly checking your phone for status updates.

Bringing It All Together

We’re all searching for ways to be more efficient and productive. I hope these strategies help you to find that extra edge.

 

 

Originally posted on TalentSmart.com by Travis Bradberry, PhD

8 Traits of Exceptional Character That Lead to Happiness and Success

8 Traits of Exceptional Character That Lead to Happiness and Success

There is nothing more valuable to any team or company than people of good character. These types of people hold traits within themselves that separate them from others. When hiring, the one thing we want to look for is an idea of their character.

If we hire a person with substandard character but who can produce, we may benefit financially but will deal with a host of problems caused by their poor character that become more of a headache than it’s worth. We want to hire and work alongside people who can produce but who also demonstrate exceptional character. In my new book Success Equations: A Path to Living an Emotionally Wealthy Life, I discuss the importance of exceptional character. Here are some of the traits I define.

1. Honest

At the core of any person with good character is honesty. They do their work clean, according to what is right, and never cheat or lie to get ahead of the curve. People with good character are who they say they are and deliver what has been promised by them and expected of them. Honesty is what separates the activator from the procrastinator, the dreamer from the doer, and the successful from the non-successful. When it comes to character, we are not what we think, we are not what we say, we are what we do.

2. Survivor

Character is largely developed from suffering the trials and errors of life. Survivors stick, they don’t quit. People of exceptional character do not quit when times get tough, nor do they treat others terribly when things don’t go their way. People who possess exceptional character have the faith and tough-mindedness to stay in the grind and get things accomplished regardless of the odds. There is a lot to be said about staying power. The more others quit under the same stressors, the more opportunity and grit the person of good character has to make sure to secure what they set out to achieve.

3. Lover

People of good character are loving people. They take the time to care. They understand that when people feel cared for they will do almost anything for them. In reality, there is no way to fake genuine caring. It has a completely different vibe than “selling” or “convincing.” People of good character impact others as deeply as they do and people want to work along side them because of their loving and genuine nature. When we work around, for or with people who are caring there is less absenteeism, fewer missed or canceled meetings and higher rates of productivity because people enjoy working around those who raise their morale.

4. Leader

When people possess good character, leadership is the natural side effect. People want to follow those who have suffered, those who possess self-awareness, patience and the ability to rise above. No matter their title in the business world, people of exceptional character draw a following with word of mouth supporting and promoting their reputation as someone others should invest in learning from and working with. When a person’s character is authentic, they live with a quiet resolve about them that others feel compelled to trust, emulate and follow.

5. Elegant

Self-control is one the most powerful traits of people who possess exceptional character. They have a calm demeaner as demonstrated in their ability to be patient and listen to others. It takes a certain amount of self-control to listen rather than talk. It is this elegant nature of those with good character that not only makes them a bit mysterious but also so interesting to others. People of good character recognize that gentleness is their greatest strength. They are above the pettiness of right and wrong when in conflict or facing challenge. They are more interested in finding the path to the solution that involves inclusion and innovation; ideas given by everyone.

6. Hard worker

Good character and hard work go hand in hand. None of us are born with good character. Good character is developed over time and through the virtues of hard work and commitment. We cannot develop our character without having to work hard and to suffer through times of conflict and challenge. The reason hard work develops character is because it is the only thing that can outdo and outlast both genius and talent.

7. Helper

More than anything, people of good character are deeply driven to help others. They do not view success and selfishness as being at all compatible. Once person’s success is also another’s. The greatest thing people of good character believe in and do is help others succeed. These types of people will jump in and help in any way they can, especially when it is good for the team. Success is never viewed as a one-man position. Success is always a team effort.

8. Inspire

Perhaps the greatest standout quality of people with exceptional character is how they inspire others nearly effortlessly. They don’t often need to be center stage or the person who’s getting all the attention; rather, they are the calm force who people listen to when they talk. Everything about these types of people make them stand out from the rest. Their most notable traits being great composure and smart decision-making.

Possessing exceptional character is more than being praised for our talent or intellect. Those are things common to all. We each have our intellectual gifts and unique talents. Those who possess good character stand out from the rest in the honing of their skills and intellect, making sure to use it for good rather than self-promotion. Good character is not given to us, like talents and IQ. It is something people have to cultivate though thought, choice, courage, commitment and dogged determination.

 

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Sherrie Campbell

Why Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone Is the Best Thing You Can Do as an Entrepreneur

Why Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone Is the Best Thing You Can Do as an Entrepreneur

When you decide to become an entrepreneur, you’re choosing to walk the road of the unknown. That’s what you’re getting into. There’s no other way around it.

You could run out of money. You could get featured on the front page of the New York Times, then have to scramble to handle the influx of new business. You’re going to be in uncomfortable, weird, bad and great situations because your job is dynamic. Every month that you grow and your business changes, it’s going to be different.

You can’t guarantee anything — except that you’re going to be uncomfortable at different points. And, when you know that, you can decide to start practicing getting out of your comfort zone.

Here are a few of my favorite ways to do it.

Do something that’s uncomfortable on a regular basis.

A while back, I sat down and made a list of all the things that make me uncomfortable. Eating new foods was near the top of the list, so I made it a priority to try a new food on a weekly basis.

Nine times out of ten, I don’t like the new thing I’ve tried. But that one time out of ten has been amazing (asparagus and spinach have been big winners for me lately). You can do something similar, but it doesn’t have to be with food. Maybe it’s just taking a different route to the office or trying a new morning routine — anything that will get you comfortable with newness and discomfort.

Start really small.

And don’t think that when I talk about trying new things, I mean making huge, sweeping changes. It’s better to start really, really small.

I’m afraid of spiders. I suck at public speaking. I’m terrified of heights. But I’m not going to overcome these fears by going all Fear Factor in a room full of spiders or thousands of people waiting to hear me speak.

Instead, to get rid of my fear of heights, I might go on a mountain hike. Or fly somewhere on a plane. Maybe I can go to the Grand Canyon and gaze down its steep cliffs for 30 seconds. True, I might not get over the fear itself. But my ability to handle that fear — and any other fear of the unknown, in general — will grow.

Put yourself into different roles.

This quarter, I’m serving in the role of customer success representative (CSR) for my software company, Mailshake. I’m talking to customers, I’m answering emails and doing webinars. I’m not an expert in any of these things, so I’m out of my comfort zone. I do a lot of these things in different capacities — just not in this state, which makes me uncomfortable.

At some point, we’ll hire a customer success person, but going through the process myself helps me understand what it is I’m trying to solve with this role. Without this discomfort-inducing exercise, I wouldn’t really understand what the role is, what the metrics are and what it’ll take for someone to be successful. But if I do the work — even for a few hours a week or a few hours a day — I’ll know more about it.

Now, when I’m ready to hire a CSR, even though I haven’t hired one before, I’ll be one step closer to being comfortable with the process.

Push yourself, with exercise.

I lost my fear of pretty much everything a few years ago, when the engine on my skydiving plane blew at 3,000 feet and we all had to jump unexpectedly. I figured, if I can survive that, there’s not much else I need to be scared of.

You don’t have to be into high-adrenaline sports to get this benefit. Any big exercise, or activity-related, goal will work. Back in 2013, I’d never run a mile before. But I set a goal for myself to run a six-minute mile. I got a couple of apps on my phone, and in eight months, I was able to run that mile in under six minutes.

The process was painful as hell, and the actual experience definitely uncomfortable. But when I got through it, I couldn’t help but think, “If I can do that, why am I so afraid of business decisions?” By pushing myself physically and testing my limits, I was able to apply the same thinking that made what I learned running a sub-six-minute mile applicable to all aspects of my business.

Remember the things that make you comfortable.

I’ve been married since I was 23. I’m lucky enough to have a beautiful house to go home to. That’s my norm. So, even when I’m uncomfortable during the day, I know that, at night, I’m going to go home and be in comfort.

You don’t have to have a fancy house or a loving family to be successful as an entrepreneur. But you should find what’s true for you. Find the things in your life that bring you comfort, and make it a point to remember them. Knowing you have something comfortable to go back to makes discomfort in business much easier to bear.

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur by Sujan Patel

Skip the Avengers: Why Entrepreneurs Should Watch ‘Black Panther’

Skip the Avengers: Why Entrepreneurs Should Watch ‘Black Panther’

Marvel’s Black Panther and Disney’s Avenger Infinity War are among the most popular superhero films of all time. Before Black Pantherwas released, it was projected to make $160 million and has proceeded to make $1.3 billion in worldwide sales. There is similar excitement with Avenger Infinity War, which garnered opening weekend estimates of $200 million in ticket sales, and analysts believe it will surpass Black Panther in the coming weeks.

While both films have destroyed box office predictions, Black Pantherremains the film with significant takeaways for entrepreneurs.

The plot of director Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther revolves around the efforts of Wakanda, a wealthy African nation, to maintain peace, independence, sovereignty and sacred traditions against a potent threat from the outside world. The people of Wakanda are led by King T’Challa, Black Panther, who governs the land during the day and fights crime with a team of powerful women at night. Unlike Infinity WarBlack Panther offers multiple examples of positive leadership practices consistent with entrepreneurship.

In Disney’s Avenger Infinity War, a team of superheroes works together to fight the unstoppable force of Thanos. For two hours and 40 minutes, Spiderman, Iron Man, the Incredible Hulk, Black Widow, Thor, Black Panther and others fight epic battles with villains to prevent Thanos from securing a powerful set of stones. While the benefits of camaraderie are on full display in Infinity War, it doesn’t compare to the teachings Black Panther offers business leaders.

Black Panther teaches business leaders to follow processes.

In business, it is critical for executives to identify how and when changes among the leadership team will occur. In the Black Pantherfilm, there exist several occasions when a transfer of power is essential. The transition happens without much discussion among the leadership team and follows a pre-determined process.

When changes in authority take place in Avenger Infinity War, chaos ensues. Everyone who stands in opposition is eliminated. A sustainable entrepreneurial venture values process and input from others when termination or promotion actions are inevitable.

Black Panther teaches business leaders humility.

As an entrepreneur, it is important to receive and follow the advice of business coaches and senior executives who have valuable insights to success. Throughout the film, King T’Challa humbly consults with the elders of the community before making decisions. They often disagree on the appropriate responses to threats, but T’Challa followed his counsel’s advice.

Thanos, who assumed leadership by genocide, does not discuss his plans with anyone. He does what he desires and is willing to sacrifice anything, including family, to obtain the ultimate power. Long-term success in business begins with a leader who values collective wisdom and actions aligned with the company’s mission.

Black Panther teaches business leaders to find value in inclusivity.

The growing awareness around the #metoo movement underscores that it is imperative entrepreneurs create and support safe work environments for all employees. In nearly every scene of Black Panther, male and female characters embody strength, intelligence and mutual respect. While Black Widow and Scarlet Witch of The Avengers play essential roles in the film, the male characters dominate the decision-making on behalf of the superhero team. Studies confirm how diverse and inclusive employees influence companies’ long-term profits through the unique perspectives, experiences and skills they can offer a company.

The Black Panther film confirms lessons of my own business experiences. Success begins with humble people in power who respect policies, team members and the people they desire to serve. My first business was teaching martial arts to young people in Chicago. When I started I didn’t see the potential for more impact, service and profit until I worked with others who added their skills and experiences to strengthen the company. With our collective effort, we expanded our services to include academic supplemental instruction and mentorship.

Although Disney’s Avenger’s Infinity War is growing in popularity, entrepreneurs who wish to acquire some of the best practices in leadership should head back to the movies for another viewing of Black Panther.

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Vernon Lindsay

Feeling Lazy Today? This Is How You Break the Laziness Loop

Feeling Lazy Today? This Is How You Break the Laziness Loop

Last night, before I went to bed, I mapped out what I was going to do today. After my morning routine, I planned to crank out this article before 11 a.m., answer emails, grab lunch and prepare for my afternoon meetings. I was going to wrap up my day by writing another article.

That’s a productive day.

As 10 a.m. approached, I realized I wasn’t going to get this piece completed. Rather than type away ferociously, I dragged my feet. I tinkered with my fantasy baseball team, stared out the window, watched a TED Talk video, went for a walk and looked over my to-do list — was there something else I should be working on?

Am I actually not the productive person I thought I was? Sure, some days are lazy. Other times, you just need a break to recharge and refocus. Neither is bad — but you don’t want to get trapped in the dreaded laziness loop, where this become a habit.

Procrastination isn’t terrible.

First off, procrastination isn’t always a bad thing. There are actually some benefits to it; it gives you time to evaluate a situation so you can create better circumstances rather than rush and make an impulsive decision. Likewise, slowing down gives you the chance to listen to your intuition.

It also prevents you from caving to peer pressure, and it assists you in managing pointless deadlines. When you’re not actively working, you’re giving your brain the time to develop new ideas. Perhaps best of all, it helps you set priorities. After procrastinating on a task, you may realize it’s not really a priority and shouldn’t be on your to-do list.

This doesn’t mean you should camp out on the couch watching TV. Instead, when you feel like doing “nothing,” take the time to reflect. Go for a walk outside. Write in your journal. Meditate. These are ways you can be productive while procrastinating.

Are you really lazy?

What happens if you’re still not “in the zone” after taking the time to reflect? You have to determine why you’re dragging your feet.

Procrastination “really has nothing to do with time management,” Joseph Ferrari, professor at DePaul University, told Psychological Science. “To tell the chronic procrastinator to just do it would be like saying to a clinically depressed person, cheer up.”

Instead, Ferrari believes there are two main reasons why even the most productive people procrastinate: (1) We’re delaying taking action because we’re not in the right mood or frame of mind to make a decision, and (2) we assume we’ll be in the right mood later.

Here’s the problem with that: It puts us in the “procrastination doom loop.” Instead of working, you check your emails, tweet, wash dishes or take a nap in the belief that you’ll be in the zone when you’re done. Most of the time, these are excuses to just waste time. As a result, you feel guilty, becoming even less likely to tackle the task.

Again, take a step back and reflect; your procrastination could be telling you something. It could be something as simple as being hungry or needing a break. It could also be something more complex — you aren’t satisfied with your work, have too large a workload or have something else on your mind.

By doing a little self-reflection, you can get to the bottom of why you’re procrastinating and take steps to rectify the problem. If you’re hungry, go eat. If you’re unsatisfied at work because it’s no longer “fun,” you may want to look at delegating responsibilities to other teammates so you have more time to spend on the big picture.

Psychologist Leon F. Seltzer suggested in an article in Psychology Today that we ditch the word “lazy” from our vocabulary. Considering yourself “lazy” won’t resolve the problem when you’re lacking motivation or self-discipline.

“My experience, both as an individual and therapist, has led me to conclude that laziness as an explanation of human behavior is practically useless,” writes Seltzer. “Referring to — or rather, disparaging, or even dismissing — a person as lazy seems to me a glib and overly simplistic way of accounting for a person’s apparent disinterest or inertia. And resorting to this term to categorize a person’s inactivity suggests to me a laziness more on the part of the describer than the person described.”

Breaking the cycle of laziness.

Even after you’ve identified what’s causing you to procrastinate, you still may have some trouble getting back on track. When that happens, here’s how you can break out of the loop.

Follow the “two-minute rule.” Similar to a strategy used by David Allen, author of Getting Things Done, if something takes less than two minutes to complete, just do it. You can also manipulate yourself using time in a different way: Set a 10-minute alarm. Psychologist and procrastination expert Timothy A. Pychl suggests you make a deal with yourself to commit to something for just 10 minutes. Once you’ve started, it’s more difficult to quit.

Make your chore or assignment as pleasant as possible. Experts like Fuschia Sirois of Bishop’s University recommend you find anything that makes the chore or task more enjoyable or meaningful. Try gamifying your task or tying the task to your values or long-term goals.

Make overwhelming takes more manageable. Oscar-winning Pixar director Pete Docter creates a list of the problems he’s putting off so he can batch them into smaller chunks. “Usually, soon into making the list, I find I can group most of the issues into two or three larger all-encompassing problems. So it’s really not all that bad. Having a finite list of problems is much better than having an illogical feeling that everything is wrong,” he told Pixar president Ed Catmull in “Creativity, Inc.

Changing your environment can also shake the cobwebs off. Get out of your office and go somewhere else to work, whether it’s a co-working space or coffee shop. Research has found we’re motivated by being surrounded by productive people. You can also take a gym break — achieving something in the gym can give you the motivation to achieve something away from it, too.

Don’t break the chain. This technique, popularized by Jerry Seinfeld, includes adding an ‘X’ on a wall calendar every time you’ve done something, from writing blog posts to issuing invoices. Eventually, there will be a chain you won’t want to break.

Finally, delegate. If there’s something better suited for someone else, delegate that responsibility to him or her. As Renzo Costarella writes, “Taking on a job that’s best fit for another colleague is not efficient.”

This isn’t an extensive list, but it’s a great place to start when you’re procrastinating and on the verge of falling into the laziness loop. While laziness in itself isn’t bad — and may just be your overwhelmed brain taking a break — it can also ride your entrepreneurial efforts off the rails. Keep laziness in check so both you and your business succeed.

 

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by John Rampton

5 Minutes Early Is On Time; On Time Is Late; Late Is Unacceptable

5 Minutes Early Is On Time; On Time Is Late; Late Is Unacceptable

I have a magic pill to sell you. It will help you make more money, be happier, look thinner, and have better relationships. It’s a revolutionary new pharmaceutical product called Late-No-More. Just one dose every day will allow you to show up on time, greatly enhancing your life and the lives of those around you.

All joking aside, being late is unacceptable. While that sounds harsh, it’s the truth and something that should be said more often. I don’t care if you’re attending a dinner party, a conference call, or a coffee meeting – your punctuality says a lot about you.

Being late bothers me so much that just thinking about it makes me queasy. My being late, which does occasionally happen, usually causes me to break out into a nervous sweat. The later I am, the more it looks like I’ve sprung a leak. Catch me more than 15 minutes late and it looks like I went swimming.

On this issue, I find myself a member of a tiny minority. It seems like most people consider a meeting time or deadline to be merely a mild advisory of something that might happen. I’ve been called uptight and unreasonable, or variations prefaced with expletives. In a world that feels perpetually late, raising the issue of punctuality isn’t a way to win popularity contests and I’m ok with that.

There’s a reason we set meeting times and deadlines. It allows for a coordination of efforts, minimizes time/effort waste, and helps set expectations. Think of how much would get done if everyone just “chilled out” and “went with the flow?” It would be the definition of inefficiency. It’s probably not that hard to imagine, considering just last week I had 13 (yes, I counted) different people blow meeting times, or miss deadlines. It feels like a raging epidemic, seemingly smoothed over by a barrage of “my bads,” “sorry, mans,” and “you know how it goes.” The desired response is “it’s all good,” but the reality is that it’s not okay. Here’s what it is.

  • Disrespectful: Being on time is about respect. It signals that you value and appreciate the other person. If you don’t respect the meeting’s participants, why are you meeting with them in the first place?
  • Inconsiderate: Unintentionally being late demonstrates an overall lack of consideration for the lives of others. You just don’t care.
  • Big-Timing: Intentionally being late is about power. It’s showing the other person, or people that you’re a “big deal” and have the upper-hand in the relationship. It’s also called being a dick.
  • Incredible: No, not in the good way. When you miss meeting times or deadlines, your credibility takes the trajectory of a lead balloon. If you can’t be counted on to be on time, how could you possibly have credibility around far tougher tasks?
  • Unprofitable: Let’s consider a scenario where five people are holding a meeting at 2 p.m. Your sauntering in ten minutes late just wasted 40 minutes of other peoples’ time. Let’s say the organization bills $200/hour. Are you paying the $133 bill? Someone certainly is.
  • Disorganized: If you can’t keep your calendar, what other parts of your life are teetering on the edge of complete disaster? Being late signals at best that you’re barely hanging on and probably not someone I want to associate with.
  • Overly-Busy: Everyone likes to equate busyness with importance, but the truly successful know that’s BS. Having a perpetually hectic schedule just signals that you can’t prioritize, or say “no,” neither of which is an endearing trait.
  • Flaky: Apparently some people just “flake out,” which seems to mean that they arbitrarily decided not to do the thing they committed to at the very last minute. Seriously? That’s ridiculous.
  • Megalomaniacal: While most grow out of this by the age of eight, some genuinely believe they are the center of the universe. It’s not attractive. Note, this is also called Donald Trump Syndrome. Do you want to be compared to Donald Trump?

As I said earlier, I’m occasionally late. Sometimes a true emergency happens, or an outlier event transpires. When it happens, I try to give a very detailed account of why I was late, apologize profusely, make sure the other person knows that I take it very seriously, and assure them it won’t happen again.

Paying attention to punctuality is not about being “judgy,” or stressed. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. It makes room for the caring, considerate, thoughtful people I want in my life, whether that’s friends or colleagues. Think of how relaxing your life would be if everyone just did what they said they’d do, when they said they’d do it? A good place to start is with yourself and a great motto is something I was taught as a child:

“5 minutes early is on time. On time is late. Late is unacceptable.” 

Originally posted on Forbes.com by Brent Beshore

TAKE THE FIRST STEP TO SUCCESS

Sign Up for Incredible Information to Make Success Happen For You!

We respect your email privacy

You have Successfully Subscribed!