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11 Quotes on Life and Love From Barbara Bush

11 Quotes on Life and Love From Barbara Bush

When former First Lady Barbara Bush penned her autobiography, her editor placed limits on the frequency with which she could use the words “close friend,” “wonderful” (once per page) and “precious” (once per chapter). She was widely known for her loving nature, her positive outlook on life and her sharp wit. “Not bad to have had a life that was filled with wonderful people and happenings, precious family, and many close friends,” she pointedly wrote on the first page of her memoir.

In honor of Bush’s passing on Tuesday at age 92, here are some of her most enduring pieces of wisdom — and a few trademark zingers — about literacy, love and life.

On life:

“Love brings a tear. Friends bring a tear. A smile, sweetness, even a kind word brings a tear. In a life of privilege there are lots of tears.” (From her autobiography, 1994)

“Whether you are talking about education, career or service, you are talking about life … and life really must have joy. It’s supposed to be fun!” (From her Wellesley College commencement address, 1990)

“You have two choices in life: You can like what you do, or you can dislike it. I have chosen to like it.” (From the Barbara Pierce Bush online memorial)

On potential:

“If human beings are perceived as potentials rather than problems, as possessing strengths instead of weaknesses, as unlimited rather that dull and unresponsive, then they thrive and grow to their capabilities.” (From the George H.W. Bush Library Center)

On literacy:

“Believe in something larger than yourself… Get involved in some of the big ideas of our time. I chose literacy because I honestly believe that if more people could read, write and comprehend, we would be that much closer to solving so many of the problems that plague our nation and our society.” (From her Wellesley College commencement address, 1990)

“The home is the child’s first school, the parent is the child’s first teacher, and reading is the child’s first subject.” (From the Barbara Pierce Bush online memorial)

On travel:

“One of the many things we have learned in all our travels is that it’s the people who count… Most people everywhere are interesting, and if you can’t find a friend, then maybe there is something wrong with you.” (From her autobiography, 1994)

On George H.W. Bush:

“I married the first man I ever kissed. When I tell this to my children, they just about throw up.” (From the Barbara Pierce Bush online memorial)

“One of the reasons I made the most important decision of my life … to marry George Bush … is because he made me laugh. It’s true, sometimes we’ve laughed through our tears … but that shared laughter has been one of our strongest bonds.” (From her Wellesley College commencement address, 1990)

“Once, when George and I were visiting after we were married, Mother asked him not to go to the bathroom at night because he woke her up when he flushed the toilet. George, already inventive at 21 years of age, went out the window!” (From her autobiography, 1994)

“He is my hero.” (From her autobiography, 1994)

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Hayden Field

4 Ways to Reinvent Yourself After Hitting Rock Bottom

4 Ways to Reinvent Yourself After Hitting Rock Bottom

I sat down with entrepreneur David Schloss to learn just that. David Schloss’ expertise is Facebook advertising. But in 2014, at age 25, he nearly became completely irrelevant. It had been a tough year. Things weren’t clicking. On Halloween that year, David had zero dollars in his bank account. He was only 72 hours away from either coming up with his rent payment or getting kicked out. His car was two weeks away from getting impounded. It felt like walls were closing in. His business was crumbling. In this period of confusion, anxiety, self-doubt, and worry, David was a single decision away from committing “career suicide,” and going back to a 9-to-5 day job.

Thankfully, for David, he turned things around. He didn’t go back to being an employee. Instead, he navigated through the tough time and today is the proud owner of a successful and thriving company. What changed? How did this one entrepreneur break through? How did he get up from his rock bottom? Here are four keys entrepreneurs can use to make it through the tough time, get on track, and rise up in business and life.

1. Let yourself be vulnerable.

Sometimes we hit walls. We struggle. Sometimes we lose. Too often as entrepreneurs, we hide those struggles. The problem is, if you don’t let yourself be real and vulnerable when you’re struggling, you will actually hold yourself back from progressing through the tough time.

In David’s period of uncertainty, being vulnerable proved to be a powerful key in his turnaround. David had hundreds of business friends on Facebook. Realizing he needed help, David reached out to every last one of them for advice and guidance. Two things happened. First, he discovered that he wasn’t alone — many other entrepreneurs had gone through similar things. That helped him develop confidence that he could get through it too. Second, they gave him actionable advice to get on the right track.

Had David stayed “closed up,” he wouldn’t have had the support he needed from others to help him move forward. When you’re in a tough spot, don’t be afraid to ask for help. Sharing the struggle is the bravest thing you can do. Being vulnerable isn’t a sign of weakness; it’s a sign of strength.

2. Develop a vision.

Ask yourself, “What do I want to create?”

It’s difficult to know if you’re progressing when you don’t know where you’re going. Stephen Covey in Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, writes about beginning with the end in mind. Know where you want to end up at the beginning of the trip. Reverse engineer what you want to do and where you want to go. That will become your North Star guiding your direction.

David developed a vision for the future he wanted to create. He used the advice from his colleagues to help him get super clear on his vision and direction. It’s that vision got him get out of bed in the morning and motivated his work.

Vision is critical. If you don’t know where you’re going, how will you know when you get there?

3. Create an action plan.

Vision is where you’re going, action is what gets you there. You’ve heard “if you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” While that’s true, there’s an important distinction to be made — your plan must be based on “action” instead of based on “results.”

In my first book, Fish Out of Water, I explain how successful “sharks” focus on what’s inside their control, vs. outside their control. While the result is not always directly within your control, action is.

David got clear on where he wanted to go, then made a daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly plan of action of how he was going to get there. To him, success wasn’t based on the amount of money he made; it was based on the actions he took to make that money. He believed that if he took the right actions, results would come as a byproduct of those actions — and they did.

Decide what you want, then focus on the thing you can control to get there. Focus on action.

4. Persist.

It’s no surprise that things don’t always go the way we planned. Persistence is a decision to keep moving towards the vision no matter the hiccups along the way. It’s not just doing “what it takes.” It’s doing “whatever it takes.” It’s falling down, and getting up again anyway. Life is like a chess game. You create a plan and a strategy, but how you win will not be the exact way you planned. Why? There are many unknown variables. It’s continuing to take the action, and not turning back.

Things didn’t abruptly become sunshine and roses while David was in the day-to-day grind, but he persisted no matter what. That’s why he is where he is today. Planning is what gets you moving, persistence is what keeps you going.

Entrepreneurship is an exciting adventure and a fulfilling journey, not just a satisfying destination. It’s not just about where we are going, but who we become throughout the process. David began to realize he wasn’t even the same person anymore. He was changing. It was like he was a butterfly now and, while he didn’t know it at the time, the low point was his metamorphosis.

As I talked about in a recent podcast interview, often times it’s the struggle that turns us into a great entrepreneur. So just remember, when you’re in a tough spot as an entrepreneur, it only means you’re being reborn into the new you. The exciting question is, what will your metamorphosis look like?

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Calvin Wayman

Make the Luck You Need to Succeed in Business

Make the Luck You Need to Succeed in Business

“You’re so lucky.”

It’s the worse thing you can say to me. And if you notice, it’s always said with a frown.

“You’re so lucky,” means that you didn’t really work for it; it was handed to you.

“You’re so lucky,” means you were just in the right place at the right time; it could have been anyone.

“You’re so lucky,” means “it should have been me.”

Meanwhile, most of the time it’s just the opposite of any of those things. You did really work for it…you put yourself in the right place at the right time…and it could have been anyone else if they had worked as hard to get it.

It’s not about being lucky; it’s about making yourself lucky.

As my father always says, “it takes a lot of hard work to be lucky.”

I was the kind of kid who always knew I wanted to go into marketing, although admittedly I’m not sure I knew what that meant back in the day. Regardless, I set my sights on what it would take to become a marketer: a good college education, solid work experience, an MBA, a real summer internship, and eventually the killer job in classic brand management…from one of the big guys.

So after graduating from college and getting a sales job at Carnation, I enrolled in the MBA program at Columbia, got a summer internship at Johnson & Johnson, and then started full time as an Assistant Product Director on Johnson’s baby products.

And all I heard was “you’re so lucky.”

As if.

Luck had nothing to do with it.

I worked hard to figure out what I needed to succeed and I went out to get it. I placed myself at the right place at the right time, so when job interviews were posted I was selected based on my very specific and purposeful background. And sure, there were others, many others, going after the same thing, but truth be told we all succeeded. Because we all worked for it. Those who didn’t make the cut looked at us as just being “lucky.”

“It takes a lot of hard work to be lucky.”

At that point, were we lucky? In some ways, yes. Because even after all that planning and hard work, it doesn’t always work out. Not by a long shot.

Been there, done that.

Luck does play a part in the grand equation here, but it’s not random luck. It’s the luck that comes from planning, preparation, and a whole lot of sweat.

“It takes a lot of hard work to be lucky.”

While I’ve had more than my fair share of mishaps, I am lucky to say that things have mostly worked out.

I try my best to make myself lucky. Hope you do the same. Good luck to you.

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur by Jim Joseph

9 New Year’s Resolutions for Small Business Success

9 New Year’s Resolutions for Small Business Success

When people hear new year’s resolutions, they often think of “exercising more,” “spending more time with the family” or “traveling more.” Besides these personal resolutions, you can also create impactful resolutions for your small business. A resolution, after all, is a decision to do something differently to bring about positive change. It’s a good time to reflect on your business’ progress and plan how you want to grow your business in the new year.

1. I will learn how to delegate and do more of it.

As a small business owner, your to-do list probably doesn’t even fit on one page. There are so many things to do, and it’s easy to delude ourselves that we need to do all of them ourselves. You can only work so many hours in a day. As a result, you’re probably exhausted, stressed and don’t have any free time outside of your business. Delegation is the key to a healthy work-life balance. However, people don’t delegate because it takes a lot of upfront effort and requires a loss of control. So how do you let someone else do certain tasks, while making sure it’s done correctly? The answer is simple: communication and training. Make sure your employees are trained enough, to the point where they can take over some of your tasks. The next step is to clearly communicate the objectives and deadlines, so that you don’t end up micromanaging.

2. I will learn how to manage my cash flow more effectively.

Cash flow is the lifeblood of any small business. In fact, a prominent study from the financial services company U.S. Bank found that 82 percent of startups and small businesses fail due to poor cash flow management. According to The Balance, “This is a great resolution for small business owners who have drastic ebbs and flows in their cash flow, have been unable to create enough capital to invest back into the business or those who don’t really understand the day-to-day finances of the business.”

3. I will take steps to improve my digital presence.

If it’s been more than a year since your site has been updated, if you haven’t taken action to make your online presence mobile-friendly, if you still haven’t created an email marketing list or if digital isn’t part of your marketing strategy at all, it’s time to add this to your new year’s resolutions. You could even take a step further than mobile-friendly and use a mobile-first approach to your digital presence.

4. I will charge what I’m worth.

Do you feel that your product or service is undervalued? If so, then it might be time to raise your rates to correspond with the value you bring to the table. You might be thinking that raising your prices will alienate certain people from becoming a customer. That could be the case, but you can’t be all things to all people. “Your target market will pay what the marketplace has proved it will pay”, says Entrepreneur. How can you implement this? Depending on your business, you can shift to a “packaged value” approach. This is where you provide tiered packages that give potential customers choices, so they can focus on the value you offer rather than the amount of time you spent. Your prices can then reflect this value.

5. I will learn something new.

New year, new skill. Choose something new to learn in 2018 — it may be directly related to your business or completely unrelated. Learning a new skill will add a dimension of interest to your life that will help to maintain that work-life balance. It will also help you to get out of your comfort zone and meet new people, if you decide to take marketing classes or learn a new language.

6. I will make business strategizing a weekly event.

Planning is vital if you want to foster a growing business. But running a small business can be chaotic and it’s easy to get sucked into the day-to-day operations. Business strategizing allows you to take a step back and highlight what worked and what didn’t, while adjusting old goals and setting new ones. So why do it just once a quarter or once a year? Set aside time each week to review your strategies. This will help you stay on track and allow you to have a clear hold on your business.

7. I will drop what’s not working and move on.

After all that business strategizing, you will know exactly what’s not working for your small business. Maybe your sales method isn’t performing well, one of your products isn’t selling or a specific partnership isn’t working out… If this is the case, it’s time to drop it. As The Balance states, “If a technique or a product or a business relationship isn’t working for you, stop using it. Don’t invest a lot of energy into trying to make the unworkable workable. Move on. Something better will turn up.”

8. I will promote my business regularly and consistently.

Since small business owners wear a lot of hats, you might not always have “marketing” at the top of your to-do list. While you should definitely focus on delivering that amazing small business experience, you shouldn’t forget to market that amazing experience to to the outside world. To attract new customers, you have to make promotion a priority. Take the time to create a marketing plan or, even your funds allow it, hire a marketing expert to help you set it up. To get started, try some of these ways to get press coverage for your small business.

9. I will enhance my technology footprint.

Few things frustrate employees — and customers — more than working with outdated technology. Slow internet speeds, clunky operating systems and inadequate tools can eat up valuable time. Make an inventory list of all your company supplies to see what needs replacing. Maybe it’s time to implement that online food ordering system, or maybe your employees could use new computers. Start the year off right by upgrading your technology footprint.

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Kimberly de Silva

50 Inspirational Quotes to Motivate You

50 Inspirational Quotes to Motivate You

Great quotes can be inspirational and motivational. You can use quotes to help guide your decisions in life, work and love. Here are 50 of the best inspirational quotes to motivate you:

  1. Nothing is impossible, the word itself says “I’m possible”! —Audrey Hepburn
  2. I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. —Maya Angelou
  3. Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re right. —Henry Ford
  4. Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection we can catch excellence. —Vince Lombardi
  5. Life is 10% what happens to me and 90% of how I react to it. —Charles Swindoll
  6. If you look at what you have in life, you’ll always have more. If you look at what you don’t have in life, you’ll never have enough. —Oprah Winfrey
  7. Remember no one can make you feel inferior without your consent. —Eleanor Roosevelt
  8. I can’t change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination. —Jimmy Dean
  9. Believe you can and you’re halfway there. —Theodore Roosevelt
  10. To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart. —Eleanor Roosevelt
  11. Too many of us are not living our dreams because we are living our fears. —Les Brown
  12. Do or do not. There is no try. —Yoda
  13. Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve. —Napoleon Hill
  14. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do, so throw off the bowlines, sail away from safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore, Dream, Discover. —Mark Twain
  15. I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed. —Michael Jordan
  16. Strive not to be a success, but rather to be of value. —Albert Einstein
  17. I am not a product of my circumstances. I am a product of my decisions. —Stephen Covey
  18. When everything seems to be going against you, remember that the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it. —Henry Ford
  19. The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any. —Alice Walker
  20. The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity. —Amelia Earhart
  21. It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. —Aristotle Onassis
  22. Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant. —Robert Louis Stevenson
  23. The only way to do great work is to love what you do. —Steve Jobs
  24. Change your thoughts and you change your world. —Norman Vincent Peale
  25. The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me. —Ayn Rand
  26. If you hear a voice within you say “you cannot paint,” then by all means paint and that voice will be silenced. —Vincent Van Gogh
  27. Build your own dreams, or someone else will hire you to build theirs. —Farrah Gray
  28. Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck. —Dalai Lama
  29. You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have. —Maya Angelou
  30. I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear. —Rosa Parks
  31. I would rather die of passion than of boredom. —Vincent van Gogh
  32. A truly rich man is one whose children run into his arms when his hands are empty. —Unknown
  33. A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.——Albert Einstein
  34. What’s money? A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and goes to bed at night and in between does what he wants to do. —Bob Dylan
  35. I have been impressed with the urgency of doing. Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Being willing is not enough; we must do. —Leonardo da Vinci
  36. If you want to lift yourself up, lift up someone else. —Booker T. Washington
  37. Limitations live only in our minds. But if we use our imaginations, our possibilities become limitless. —Jamie Paolinetti
  38. If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat! Just get on. —Sheryl Sandberg
  39. Certain things catch your eye, but pursue only those that capture the heart. —Ancient Indian Proverb
  40. When one door of happiness closes, another opens, but often we look so long at the closed door that we do not see the one that has been opened for us. —Helen Keller
  41. Everything has beauty, but not everyone can see. —Confucius
  42. How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world. —Anne Frank
  43. When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down “happy”. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life. —John Lennon
  44. The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be. —Ralph Waldo Emerson
  45. We can’t help everyone, but everyone can help someone. —Ronald Reagan
  46. Everything you’ve ever wanted is on the other side of fear. —George Addair
  47. We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. —Plato
  48. Nothing will work unless you do. —Maya Angelou
  49. I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the water to create many ripples. —Mother Teresa
  50. What we achieve inwardly will change outer reality. —Plutarch

 

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur.com by Travis Bradberry

How Much Risk Should First-Time Entrepreneurs Take On?

How Much Risk Should First-Time Entrepreneurs Take On?

Risk, especially entrepreneurship risk, has two parts: assessment and action.

After recognizing an opportunity and measuring the risk by talking to experts and doing your homework, the next part of the entrepreneurship mindset is taking that risk.

But how much risk is appropriate?

It would be easy if there were a magic formula that could tell us when risk is calculated and smart versus when it’s not. But there isn’t.

The track record isn’t clear. For every successful entrepreneur such as Richard Branson who preaches taking risk, there is another who urges caution when doing something such as leaving a steady job to launch a new venture.

While you can always choose not to take risk, that means you’re essentially choosing not to be an entrepreneur. That’s fine. Risk and entrepreneurship aren’t for everyone. But there really isn’t a path to entrepreneurship that doesn’t include risk.

To win, you have to bet.

For those who aren’t naturally adventurous or risk-takers at heart, being able to bet — risking your money, energy and ideas — is a skill. Like any skill, it can be learned.  It gets easier when you watch others do it.

Ask any so-called serial entrepreneur — people who’ve taken venture risk over and over again. Dale Turken is one. Counting his latest endeavor, ScrapGo, he’s launched a dozen companies across several industries.

“Taking risk gets much easier with practice,” he says.

That’s why we teach risk taking as an essential part of thinking like an entrepreneur.

Through practice and observation, we know we can teach tomorrow’s entrepreneurs to bet smarter and more often. But unlike practicing entrepreneurs whose wagers have real, lifelong consequences to families and industries, we teach taking risk in the comparative safety of a classroom.

Our students still take risks. They are required, for example, to present ideas in front of their peers, and many go on to business-plan competitions where they present in front of hundreds of people including established business leaders. For high school students, these are usually huge emotional investments that help prepare them to take and manage future risks.

Further, in a classroom, teachers and mentors challenge students to reach higher and risk more. When they fail, it’s fine.

By watching, doing and preparing, future entrepreneurs get more comfortable with risk. They quickly become less nervous and more confident in their ideas and goals. As they learn that they can also influence the outcome, a few blossom into risk tigers — throwing more energy and passion behind their investments.

Not everyone is Richard Branson — the living caricature of a thrill-seeking maverick. For the rest of us, that safe space to experience risk is essential. It’s doubly essential for young people who may be experimenting with financial and business risk for the first time.

When you’re ready to take your risk and make your bets, here are some things from our classroom experiences that may help make the experience — and outcome — better.

1. Start small. We send students with $20 in cash to a wholesale mart or district to buy products for resale. That’s likely too small a venture for most people — but the point is the same. If you’re new to entrepreneurship risk, it’s unwise to risk everything on your first venture.

2, Expect to fail. Failure isn’t a bad word or a bad thing. Figuring out what people want by learning what they don’t want is part of the process. But that means first-time risk takers should prepare for the possibility that their investment won’t pay off. At least not at first.

3. The next matters. While you may not control the results outright, you can influence the outcome of your risk. Hard work, flexibility and marketing can all influence whether your venture succeeds and by how much. Investing in entrepreneurship isn’t a lottery ticket. If it feels as though your entrepreneurship risk is a lottery ticket, you may need to back up a step and re-assess.

4. Watch, don’t read. Instead of looking back on past successes of others, go to a micro-investor meet up or entrepreneurship club and watch others as they make investments of time, money and energy in real time. Watching them calculate, risk, succeed and fail in a real-world setting will help you spot dangers and opportunities when it’s your turn. The people you meet can also be great mentors.

5. Share your passion. When you’re passionate and confident, friends and family will support you. Sometimes, an encouraging word is the nudge you need to take the plunge.

 

 

Originally posted on Entrepreneur by Amy Rosen

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